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Rajiv
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Re: Science News

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On a humorous light note , just curious how Muslims would react in having a Pig's heart in their body :-) :-) , and coincidentally one of the team members which carried out this operation had a Pakistan origin surgeon.


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prasen9
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Re: Science News

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So, Suresh what does this mean? Seems like some particle ate too much and became too heavy. I think there is a perfectly logical explanation. Many during COVID could not walk as much and got fat. This particle is no exception. But, now that is indeed fat, what does it mean for our theories? Seems like it is upsetting the Standard Model? Shall we have a fatter model soon?


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suresh
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Re: Science News

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prasen9 wrote: Thu Apr 07, 2022 9:05 pm So, Suresh what does this mean? Seems like some particle ate too much and became too heavy. I think there is a perfectly logical explanation. Many during COVID could not walk as much and got fat. This particle is no exception. But, now that is indeed fat, what does it mean for our theories? Seems like it is upsetting the Standard Model? Shall we have a fatter model soon?
I don't think it is a six sigma result (I have not seen the paper). So one should wait to see if the result holds up further scrutiny.


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prasen9
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Re: Science News

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Ah right. So, let's wait for the repeat experiment to produce the same thing and then we can know. Thanks. Here is the Science paper btw if you want to take a quick look.
A sample of approximately 4 million W boson candidates is used to obtain 𝑀𝑊=80,433.5±6.4stat±6.9syst=80,433.5±9.4 MeV/𝑐2, the precision of which exceeds that of all previous measurements combined (stat, statistical uncertainty; syst, systematic uncertainty; MeV, mega–electron volts; c, speed of light in a vacuum). This measurement is in significant tension with the standard model expectation.
I am still intrigued. Here is a perspective article, again in Science Seems like the LHC is trying to measure the same and see what happens.
Based on 10 years of data recorded at the CDF, they report a W boson mass with an impressive precision of 117 parts per million (ppm)—twice as precise as the previous most accurate measurement. Their measured W boson mass is in direct contention with the SM because it is heavier than the SM prediction by seven standard deviations.
Sorry, if I am unrealistically excited with this.


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suresh
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Re: Science News

Post by suresh »

prasen9 wrote: Fri Apr 08, 2022 11:51 am Ah right. So, let's wait for the repeat experiment to produce the same thing and then we can know. Thanks. Here is the Science paper btw if you want to take a quick look.
Apparently it is a seven sigma result and so cannot be ignored. It appears that there are several issues and so we need to wait for another experiment (LHC) to validate the result.


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prasen9
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Re: Science News

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They said that the precision is better than any that has been done before. Let's see what the LHC experiments show. Now it is your turn (theoretical physicists to explain the discrepancy). I'm sure you guys have tons of different models --- one of which will say, "I told you so." Or is there? Anyway, I guess we will wait for things to be tightened up even further by the next experiment and see whether there are any systemic errors (or even statistical ones).


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suresh
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Re: Science News

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prasen9 wrote: Mon Apr 11, 2022 1:42 am Now it is your turn (theoretical physicists to explain the discrepancy). I'm sure you guys have tons of different models --- one of which will say, "I told you so." Or is there?
:rofl: So true.


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prasen9
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Re: Science News

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I was sort of obliquely referring to this:
Heinemeyer’s favourite explanation for the discrepancy is supersymmetry, a model that predicts the existence of a heavier partner for each standard-model particle. Such particles could continually pop in and out of the vacuum surrounding a W particle, making it heftier.
from this nature article.

Man, as they say, truth is stranger than fiction. So there is some heavier partner for each standard-model particle and we are just finding that fatso? Or maybe all this is maya as Jay would say.

Nowadays, I have to walk a tightrope to explain things to my kids. In a simpler world, there used to be protons, neutrons, electrons. Then, there were meson, photon, muon. Then, we had quarks, which are not quirks of physics. And, even those started getting weird. Up, down, strange (somebody has a sense of humor), charm (another beautiful name), bottom, top. Then, there were leptons, electron nutrino, muon nutrino, tau (ex-CM of Haryana?), and tau neutrino. Then there came 12 bosons, W, Z, and what not. And finally, the Higgs Boson. When we are just about getting somewhat used to things, some heavier partner for *each* standard-model particle. And, that may or may not be.

I think now my easier explanation to my kids is, "I do not know." when they ask what is an atom made of. Sounds more convincing and easier to convey.

I am dreading when they will ask me what is dark matter and who was the culprit who stole all that missing mass. I think unlike the standard model, maybe my standard answer "I don't know" will hold up much longer at this rate.


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prasen9
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Re: Science News

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If you are tired of saying, "I don't know." Or want to really get your kids (and secretly you yourself) to learn, point them to this Jorge Cham's fantastic comic on the Higgs Boson It was probably drawn quite some time ago before the Higgs particle was confirmed (in 2013?) but the ability of Jorge to explain the essence of physical concepts is perhaps as insightful as his ability to squeeze the essence of the relationship between an advisor and a Ph.D. student (which is comics mostly are on) and the trials and tribulations of grad student life. He was a physics major and I find his physics comics equally fascinating and illuminating. Meaning, I read about a whole bunch of this stuff and know things to a point, but somehow reading his comics really hits the hammer right on the nail.

Here is a quote:
What is mass?

When you think of things having mass, it means it has "stuff" to it right?

Wrong. It is not actually stuff.

Particles have mass but no volume. (They are point particles).

Mass is a characteristic of a particle. Like charge.

Some have it. Some don't. It is a different kind of charge.
With kids that gets you into an infinite loop of "what"s just like they exhaust you (and some of you secretly love it, you masochists) with infinite loops of "why"s. So, after this, I had to scramble to answer the question "What is charge?" ... And, so goes life.

Or, if you are too tired, send all you kids to Suresh. I blame him and his types for all this mess. Let him deal with the questions. :-)


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suresh
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Re: Science News

Post by suresh »

prasen9 wrote: Thu Apr 14, 2022 1:10 pm Or, if you are too tired, send all you kids to Suresh. I blame him and his types for all this mess. Let him deal with the questions. :-)
You are welcome to send your kids to me. :-) I agree that Jorge Cham is amazing.

The real issue is that analogies used to describe complex physics are not to be taken seriously. I hate many of them. One of them is the stretched membrane analogy for curvature of spacetime.


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prasen9
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Re: Science News

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Agree. But, how do you explain things then? Meaning is there a better analogy for spacetime? People do not seem to grasp these things otherwise.

p.s. Okay, my kids are going. You'll regret what you asked for though. :-) -p


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prasen9
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Re: Science News

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Okay, the LHC is back! Next run will be completed by 2024. Popcorn!


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Kumar
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Re: Science News

Post by Kumar »

Does this change the way injuries are treated? Small study has come out indicating that treating inflammation with anti inflammatory may actually result in chronic pain!

https://www.statnews.com/2022/05/11/stu ... onic-pain/


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suresh
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Re: Science News

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