ATP Tennis/Non-India Davis Cup

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Re: ATP Tennis/Non-India Davis Cup

Post by Sin Hombre » Fri Aug 10, 2018 11:55 pm

And now the young Greek beats Zverev. Excellent stuff. We are clearly seeing the emergence of the next generation of slam contenders after 8 years of mediocrity in between.

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Re: ATP Tennis/Non-India Davis Cup

Post by sameerph » Sun Aug 12, 2018 5:25 am

Tsitsipas now beats Anderson in terms SF. He is having an amazing run in Toronto. Faces Nadal in final.

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Re: ATP Tennis/Non-India Davis Cup

Post by Sin Hombre » Mon Aug 13, 2018 1:17 am

Yeah, became the first player in almost 30 years to beat 4 top-10 players in the same event though his magical run was ended by Nadal in the finals.

Still, he beat 6 top-10 players as a teenager and that already puts him in a select group. It does appear that tennis will directly transition from the 80s group to the 97+ group of Zverev, Tsitsipas, Shapo and co.

Nadal in rare sensible scheduling has duly pulled out of Cinci.

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Re: ATP Tennis/Non-India Davis Cup

Post by PKBasu » Mon Aug 13, 2018 1:21 am

Tsitsipas vs Zverev will hopefully become the next generation's big rivalry. But Sasha has failed repeatedly on the big stage, which makes one wonder whether he is missing the temperament to succeed. Dimitrov is clearly a write-off, Thiem too one-dimensional, so that generation has faded.

Nadal and Federer are purposefully avoiding playing each other except in the Slams.

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Re: ATP Tennis/Non-India Davis Cup

Post by S_K_S » Mon Aug 13, 2018 1:42 pm

PKBasu wrote:
Mon Aug 13, 2018 1:21 am
But Sasha has failed repeatedly on the big stage, which makes one wonder whether he is missing the temperament to succeed
He has won 9 titles by the age of 21. I'd hate for you to be my school teacher PKB :p

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Re: ATP Tennis/Non-India Davis Cup

Post by arjun2761 » Mon Aug 13, 2018 2:20 pm

Sin Hombre wrote:
Mon Aug 13, 2018 1:17 am
Yeah, became the first player in almost 30 years to beat 4 top-10 players in the same event though his magical run was ended by Nadal in the finals.

Still, he beat 6 top-10 players as a teenager and that already puts him in a select group. It does appear that tennis will directly transition from the 80s group to the 97+ group of Zverev, Tsitsipas, Shapo and co.

Nadal in rare sensible scheduling has duly pulled out of Cinci.
Interesting how you break out the age groups. In the US, those born between 1980-97 are termed the millennials whose defining characteristic thus far has been entitled and somewhat lazy. Gen Z (or digital natives) who have followed them have thus far shown the opposite characteristics...

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Re: ATP Tennis/Non-India Davis Cup

Post by sameerph » Thu Aug 16, 2018 5:31 am

sameerph wrote:
Tue Feb 27, 2018 9:02 am
News about major changes planned for davis cup which will be held in 1 week towards the end of the year-

ITF announces plans for transformation of Davis Cup
Under the plans, the World Cup of Tennis Finals will be played over seven days in November in the traditional week of the Davis Cup Final. The Finals will feature a round-robin format followed by a quarterfinal knockout stage. Each tie will consist of two singles and one doubles over best-of-three sets. The 16 World Group nations will automatically qualify for the Finals, and a further two nations will be selected.

There will also be a play-off round held during the Finals which will include the eight nations that qualify from the Zone Group I events. The eight play-off winners will earn a place in the following year’s Finals.

Read more at http://www.itftennis.com/news/281842.as ... trSxICQ.99
I think this will take away the essence of davis cup , i.e home and away matches.
These radical changes to the davis cup format is to be voted at an ITF AGM today in Florida. Here is the latest news on this -

LTA will vote 'No' on proposed changes to the Davis Cup format, in defiance of the All England Club

It looks like Australia and Germany are already opposing it while US and France are supporting the change. So, it would be a close race for ITF to get two third majority to approve the changes. It seems AITA is also opposing the idea.

All India Tennis Association not to vote for Davis Cup changes

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Re: ATP Tennis/Non-India Davis Cup

Post by S_K_S » Thu Aug 16, 2018 12:50 pm

Glad to see AITA are voting no. Hopefully they don't change their mind.

Vote is going to be very close...https://twitter.com/BenRothenberg/statu ... 7020078081

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Re: ATP Tennis/Non-India Davis Cup

Post by jaydeep » Thu Aug 16, 2018 2:15 pm

As per report, #DavisCupVote *agree*, bringing complete change to the 118-year-old competition, Davis Cup ... ITF managed the needed two-thirds majority, getting 71% of the vote in Orlando.

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Re: ATP Tennis/Non-India Davis Cup

Post by NeerajC » Thu Aug 16, 2018 5:32 pm

An article from NYtimes yesterday provides some additional perspective and info on behind-the-scene politics. This came out yesterday, before the vote.

https://www.nytimes.com/2018/08/14/spor ... p-itf.html

Radical Changes to Davis Cup Will Be Up for Vote This Week

By Christopher Clarey
Aug. 14, 2018

Even in a divided sport with a surplus of governing bodies, there is finally genuine consensus that Davis Cup needs to change.

The very prickly question, as the International Tennis Federation gathers in Orlando, Fla., this week for its annual general meeting, is just how much change the sport is prepared to accept.

The 118-year-old men’s national team event was long ago a pillar of tennis. It is now a sideshow: good for boosting a few hotbed countries’ morale but not for routinely attracting tennis’s biggest stars or generating consistent global interest and major 21st century revenue.

Under a proposal from the I.T.F.’s president, David Haggerty, and board of directors to be voted on Thursday, the Cup would condense from year-round competition to two weeks, double the total prize money to at least $20 million, and shorten matches to best-of-three sets instead of best-of-five.

Currently, in the top division of Davis Cup, 16 national teams compete over four knockout rounds interspersed throughout the year with a two-team final in November hosted by one of the finalists.

The new Davis Cup, with the backing of a $3 billion commitment over 25 years from the investment group Kosmos, would bring together 18 national teams at a neutral site for a week in November each year. The initial venues would be in Europe to reduce travel concerns for players who participate in the elite ATP Finals in London that month.

There would also be a preliminary round in February comprising 12 head-to-head matches hosted by national federations. The winners of those matches would advance to the 18-team final along with the previous year’s semifinalists and, in one of the more questionable parts of the plan, two wild-card nations selected by the organizers.

All matches in the final phase, which includes round-robin group play with eight teams advancing to the knockout stage, would be decided in three sets instead of the current five. And each matchup would consist of two singles matches and one doubles match rather than the current four singles matches and a doubles match.

Haggerty said the deal is a way to stabilize the I.T.F. economically and increase grass-roots funding for tennis worldwide by giving $25 million annually to the national federations. He said more than $15 million also would be invested in staging the new November event.

After decades of dithering, the proposal on the agenda in Orlando is genuinely radical — far too radical for some. It also needs two-thirds of the votes by 147 I.T.F. member nations to pass. That is a high bar to clear, especially when a handful of traditional tennis nations, including the United States, Britain, France and Australia, have more power by holding 12 votes each.

“I think at this point and time we have the votes, but I don’t underestimate anything,” Haggerty said in a telephone interview from Orlando.

Leaders of three of the four Grand Slam tournaments — Wimbledon, the United States Open and French Open — have backed the new format.

So has Larry Ellison, the American software tycoon who bought the BNP Paribas Open in Indian Wells, Calif., and turned it into one of the world’s best tournaments. He has pledged to invest in the new Davis Cup project with an eye on bringing the final to Indian Wells in 2021.

But emotions and resistance are running hot, particularly in Australia, where serial success in Davis Cup once played a role in raising remote country’s international profile.

“Most of us agree the Davis Cup needs some tinkering around the edges to ensure the best players play,” said Wally Masur, the former Australian Davis Cup player and captain, “but the radical overhaul in this proposal will decimate over 100 years of tennis tradition that has helped grow the men’s game to this point.”

The proposal comes in the midst of a turf war with the ATP Tour, which had been in negotiations with Kosmos and is planning a revival of the World Team Cup. The ATP event, if implemented in January 2020, could be a direct competitor and existential threat to the revamped Davis Cup, particularly if the World Team Cup offers ranking points and Davis Cup does not.

Increasing the tension, Tennis Australia, the sport’s governing body in that country, is set to be a partner in the World Team Cup, which would be staged at various sites in Australia before the Australian Open in late January.

That move is driven in part by Tennis Australia’s desire to protect its hold on the early-season tennis calendar. Although Tennis Australia has insisted that the World Team Cup and Davis Cup can coexist, as they did in the past, the project clearly weakens Tennis Australia’s credibility as it calls for rethinking the Davis Cup project.

“Of course it would be in their best interests to delay a decision so a World Team Cup can take place, which could dramatically change the context of Davis Cup,” Haggerty said. “I think there’s a conflict of interest, as do some others, about their objectivity.”

It surely would have been preferable for the I.T.F. to have first tried some less extreme Davis Cup reforms through the years to improve superstar participation: first-round byes for the previous season’s finalists, or even a biennial instead of an annual competition.

Instead, Davis Cup is facing sea change, which may be coming too late if the star players don’t buy in. It is unlikely that both team competitions can thrive in the long term. What the sport needs is cooperation: one major event with united support, not a Davis Cup and World Team Cup with similar formats within six weeks of each other.

Though ATP and I.T.F. leaders have held in-depth discussions about joining forces to stage a single event, no agreement has been reached. The ATP player council threw its support behind the World Team Cup, which the tour would own, at Wimbledon earlier this summer.

The lack of clear player support makes the Davis Cup overhaul even more of a gamble, although Haggerty said existing sponsors are demanding change.

“There are players who are supportive,” he said, citing Novak Djokovic and Rafael Nadal. “And I think that once this is approved, I think that’s when we will see more.”

Haggerty, a former tennis industry executive and president of the U.S.T.A., has made miscalculations in his first term at the I.T.F. by pushing format changes that failed to materialize, like a combined final for the Davis Cup and the Fed Cup, the annual team competition for women. Tensions within the I.T.F. also have increased with some expressing concern that Haggerty, who will be up for re-election next year, has acted too independently.

More recently, he has drawn criticism for his treatment of Bernard Giudicelli, the French Tennis Federation president, who was found guilty of defamation in September last year in France, receiving a fine but no jail sentence.

Giudicelli is a member of the I.T.F. board of directors and chairman of its Davis Cup committee. Though defamation is a civil offense in many nations, it is a criminal offense in France, and as such, should have meant Giudicelli’s removal from the board, according to the I.T.F. constitution.

Instead, he continued to serve in his post and has become a valuable ally to Haggerty with his support of the Kosmos deal, after initially being resistant to major changes. Haggerty said that since mid-July, Giudicelli has no longer exercised the rights of a board member, including voting rights.

The board has proposed an amendment to the constitution, which will be considered in Orlando, that would force board members out only if their offense would constitute a “criminal offense in the majority of jurisdictions in which the sport is played” and if there is a “custodial sentence” or the board feels the member’s continued presence would bring “the I.T.F. into disrepute.”

The amendment has been widely viewed within tennis as an attempt to save Giudicelli. But Haggerty denied favoritism, saying the issue was “being used to interfere with the momentum for the Davis Cup reforms.”

There is indeed plenty at stake in Orlando and not just for Davis Cup, even if that remains the biggest and thorniest subject on the agenda.

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Re: ATP Tennis/Non-India Davis Cup

Post by PKBasu » Tue Aug 28, 2018 7:14 am

Dimitrov ran into wildcard Wawrinka at both Wimbledon and the US Open. At Wimbledon, Dimitrov choked (as McEnroe cruelly showed in his commentary) in a very tight match. At the US Open, the former champion Wawrinka won in straight sets.

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Re: ATP Tennis/Non-India Davis Cup

Post by PKBasu » Sat Sep 08, 2018 4:57 am

Novak has been totally rejuvenated since scraping through to the Wimbledon title. Now he is looking unstoppable, but perhaps DelPo can change that!

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Re: ATP Tennis/Non-India Davis Cup

Post by PKBasu » Sat Oct 13, 2018 8:50 am

It's the GreatGen vs the NextGen in the Shanghai Masters semifinal -- Federer vs Coric, and Djokovic vs SashaZverev.

One generation has signally failed to challenge the GreatGen (Federer, Nadal, Djokovic), can this NextGen finally rise to the challenge? Interestingly, the GreatGen have only really been successfully challenged by players of their own generation occasionally -- Murray, Wawrinka, DelPotro. Of the intervening generation, only Cilic did it and Nishikori came close. "Generation" basically is a cohort of 5-7 years; arguably Federer was a slightly earlier generation than the rest, but he became a Slam winner at a later age, then dominated for the next 5 years.

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Re: ATP Tennis/Non-India Davis Cup

Post by prasen9 » Mon Oct 15, 2018 2:11 pm

Cilic and Del Potro are 5 days apart by age. I would put Cilic, del Potro, Murray, Djokovic, and Nadal in the same generation. They are born between 1988 and 1986. Add Wawrinka and you stretch it to 1985. If we want to include Federer who was born in 1981 and there is a good case to do so, then we have to include Roddick.

I would rather make two mini-gens: Gen-upper: Safin, Ferrero, Hewitt, Federer, Roddick, Gen-lower: Wawrinka, Nadal, Murray, Djokovic, del Potro, Cilic.

After that it has been yawn!

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Re: ATP Tennis/Non-India Davis Cup

Post by Varma » Mon Oct 22, 2018 3:37 am

Tsitsipas wins his maiden ATP tile at Stockholm 500 to be the first Greek to win a pro Title. Of all the players in 19-21 age group, I like this fellow a lot. While a few others showed minor inconsistencies (Taifoe, Fritz, Rubulev), I think this kid has been showing remarkable cool and steady progress to climb up in the rankings. In my books he is definitely going to be No.1 some day and will win Grandslams. I have some bias towards guys who play one-handed backhand, but somehow this guy comes across as the next Champion for more reasons than one.

- Varma

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