Santosh Trophy

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PKBasu
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Re: Santosh Trophy

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prasen9 wrote: Mon May 02, 2022 10:10 pm It used to be Punjab and Kerala who were the pesky troublesome teams. Maybe Punjab a tad better than Kerala :-) Is Punjab all gone to cricket? :-( And, for some time Services. Then, maybe Goa. So, the interesting team is Manipur. In line with the development of the sport in the northeast in the last 30 years or so.
Punjab used to have 2 teams doing well in the Durand and Rover Cups -- JCT Mills (Phagwara) and Punjab Police. Plus BSF. I was in Phagwara for a wedding, and it seems the legendary football team is gone, although the company still seems to exist. The team (which won the inaugural national football league) disbanded in 2011, so missed the possibilities of the ISL -- although the company may well have decided against that as well.


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Re: Santosh Trophy

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^^^ Oh yeah. I remember JCT Mills coming to Kerala for the Sait Nagjee Tournament in Kozhikode in the late 70s. They won some of those. Unfortunately the tournament died in 1995. JCT Mills were big at one time.


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Re: Santosh Trophy

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jayakris wrote: Tue May 03, 2022 4:01 am By the way, I just realized that the place "Santosh," after whose Maharaja the trophy was named, is no longer in India!!! ... I thought it was somewhere in West Bengal, but it is apparently in Bangladesh.
If you search for Santosh on Wikipedia, the only thing that shows up is that it was the birthplace of Maulana Bhashani, a notoriously pro-China and anti-India politician, who advocated Islamic Socialism but was known to be in the pay of Maoist China from at least the early-1960s. He ignited the anti-India movement to protest the Farakka Barrage (near Malda) which some Bangladeshis claim has caused the Padma river to silt and dry up.

Manmatha Nath Roy Chowdhury, the raja of Santosh who helped found East Bengal club and was one of the early presidents of the AIFF in its heyday, was famous for his philanthropy and his benign rule as zamindar. But all that is now long forgotten (although there is a Raja Santosh Roy road in Kolkata, and a Santosh palace in ruins on that road, apart from one wing occupied by a German couple who have refurbished it). He was also a descendant of King Pratapaditya Roy of Jessore, who defeated Akbar and Jehangir's armies a few times, but was eventually subdued by the Mughals. WB's long-serving CM, Dr Bidhan Chandra Roy also claimed descent from Pratapaditya, a rare Bengali military hero of the mediaeval period.


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Re: Santosh Trophy

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PKBasu wrote: Thu May 05, 2022 12:30 pm He ignited the anti-India movement to protest the Farakka Barrage (near Malda) which some Bangladeshis claim has caused the Padma river to silt and dry up.
I am surprised that all Bangladeshis do not claim that. It is common sense. Every dam, everywhere in the world has diverted water from downstream to "side-stream". The Colorado river does not even end up in the sea these days. All the water is gone by the time it reaches the lower part of Mexico. The stupid Americans have diverted water and dug up water from under the ground at a rate they know will finish the water in 25 years! And, some of it they have bottled up (I think Nestle) and sold. For an area that does not have water, this is crazy. Soon, we will have to pay the piper though. The west will have severe droughts.

I think it is time to damn the dams and take them down. They do more harm than good. In Michigan, one city took out a dam and created a riverside-park, etc. on the newly found land where the water was logged by the dam. Two cities did not. In one year of torrential rains, these dams broke and the two cities got drowned. The one that had taken the dam out was not affected.

I am not saying that we should take out the Farakka Dam right away but it should be done in an orderly manner in due course after we have figured out the water and energy equations. Because water was more available, the innovation to use less-water-hungry varieties of seeds, etc. was given up and water-sucking varieties were planted. Bad in the long-term.

:Offtopic: <end-rant>