Search found 23172 matches

by jayakris
Sun Dec 17, 2017 1:27 am
Forum: General Tennis Discussion
Topic: WTA Tour/Non-India Fed Cup
Replies: 1040
Views: 86203

Re: WTA Tour/Non-India Fed Cup

As per the dictionary, astRas are pretty much ballistic and missile type weapons. Not knifes and swords. It got used in words for things like arsenal and armory, because they are typically filled with launched weapons (because you lose them when you use, while only much fewer hand-held weapons are m...
by jayakris
Sat Dec 16, 2017 11:51 pm
Forum: The Cricket Forum
Topic: General Cricket Thread ...
Replies: 2746
Views: 166091

Re: General Cricket Thread ...

A donkey drop is a really bad ball -- specifically one that is flighted so much that it loops over the batsman's head and lands on the stumps (when it is really successful). More often than not, a donkey drop goes high up and lands somewhere near the batsman and gets walloped for six. Ah, I see. Th...
by jayakris
Sat Dec 16, 2017 3:49 pm
Forum: Tennis Player Forums
Topic: Arjun Kadhe thread
Replies: 18
Views: 1025

Re: Arjun Kadhe thread

I think the two titles will bring Arjun's doubles ranking also pretty close to his singles rank, right outside top-600. That is a great job within just a few months of the pro tour. Keeps him in good shape to play futures anywhere and make a move up to the challenger levels.
by jayakris
Sat Dec 16, 2017 1:47 pm
Forum: Sania Mirza Fan Forum
Topic: Sania Mirza Tournaments - 2017
Replies: 43
Views: 2066

Re: Sania Mirza Tournaments - 2017

She just turned 31. Not that old for doubles, and I think she still enjoys playing it. Unless recovering from the surgery becomes way too hard, I would think she will want to continue.... Probably at least till the next Olympics?
by jayakris
Sat Dec 16, 2017 1:33 pm
Forum: General Tennis Discussion
Topic: WTA Tour/Non-India Fed Cup
Replies: 1040
Views: 86203

Re: WTA Tour/Non-India Fed Cup

Also - if I can remember right surgery is called "Salya-kriya" - not "SastRa-kRiya". SalyakRiya is also surgery. "Salya" is a pointed weapon, like a spear or an arrow. Maybe those were also used in surgery in India. This word seems to be more used in Hindi. "Sastra" is more a of cutting weapon, lik...
by jayakris
Sat Dec 16, 2017 8:34 am
Forum: General Tennis Discussion
Topic: WTA Tour/Non-India Fed Cup
Replies: 1040
Views: 86203

Re: WTA Tour/Non-India Fed Cup

Interesting. I guess in Bengali, it got broadened to mean "weapon" generally, irrespective of whether it flies. I would call a sword an "astra" (pronounced astrow in Bengali). So, the senses got changed a bit when it went from Samskrt to Bengali. I don't believe "asTRa" is used to refer to all weap...
by jayakris
Sat Dec 16, 2017 8:11 am
Forum: Tennis Tournaments
Topic: End of the year Women's ITF tournaments - Indore/Solapur/Pune/Navi Mumbai
Replies: 120
Views: 4797

Re: End of the year Women's ITF tournaments - Indore/Solapur/Pune/Navi Mumbai

^^^ I think I saw her dad listed as her coach at the ITF website. Maybe he is influential in the tennis circles around there. She is among the top sub-juniors in Maharashtra or something though. Not deserving of this many wildcards, for sure.
by jayakris
Sat Dec 16, 2017 8:08 am
Forum: General Chit Chat
Topic: Know your English
Replies: 279
Views: 31457

Re: Know your English

Jay, I got a word for you which is fairly common in India which I have received many blank stares for usage in the US, and that is quizzing as the activity. Actually, I am not sure if it is even a popular activity in schools and universities outside of India and the UK (and apparently Belgium as we...
by jayakris
Sat Dec 16, 2017 7:44 am
Forum: General Chit Chat
Topic: Know your English
Replies: 279
Views: 31457

Re: Know your English

Today in an email to the faculty, I used the term "and we can tick whichever choice we want" while writing naturally. After sending it, I realized that people would possibly not know the term "tick" as a verb and guess from the context :-) I am surprised you took this long to notice that, though. I...
by jayakris
Sat Dec 16, 2017 2:05 am
Forum: General Tennis Discussion
Topic: WTA Tour/Non-India Fed Cup
Replies: 1040
Views: 86203

Re: WTA Tour/Non-India Fed Cup

Wrapping her Aussie nationality around her. "Astra" the first part of the country's name. No wonder her nickname is "Roo". The parents probably checked if that means something in India too. In samskRtam, it is anything that flies and strikes hard. "Arrow" or "Missile". I hope she serves astras!
by jayakris
Fri Dec 15, 2017 10:53 pm
Forum: Tennis Tournaments
Topic: End of the year Women's ITF tournaments - Indore/Solapur/Pune/Navi Mumbai
Replies: 120
Views: 4797

Re: End of the year Women's ITF tournaments - Indore/Solapur/Pune/Navi Mumbai

I think Akanksha had got a singles and doubles wildcard in the earlier event too. It is really not fair to others. Jay
by jayakris
Fri Dec 15, 2017 5:55 am
Forum: General Chit Chat
Topic: Know your English
Replies: 279
Views: 31457

Re: Know your English

I have seen "juggernaut" (coming from Jagannath) used in odd places like baseball news and all that. But this word "felicitate" stumped me today, when I realized how well-known it is in India and unknown it is elsewhere. There is no reason that I can imagine for why it would be like that. It is not ...
by jayakris
Fri Dec 15, 2017 5:07 am
Forum: General Chit Chat
Topic: Know your English
Replies: 279
Views: 31457

Re: Know your English

"Sacrosanct" is very much used and known in the US and elsewhere. People like Hillary Clinton has used it. Google brings up many more pages with it, before you see Indian pages. "Pre-pone" is known to be an Indian word, and people know of it to be so. The complete forgetting of an old English word l...
by jayakris
Fri Dec 15, 2017 4:55 am
Forum: General Chit Chat
Topic: Know your English
Replies: 279
Views: 31457

Re: Know your English

Continental Europeans use it (felicitations, felicitaciones) a lot and I can definitely recall using it while living there and not receiving blank stares. That said, I never knew it was archaic in Anglo-American English. I will try it with some Dutch and Swiss tomorrow and report :D I think I had u...
by jayakris
Fri Dec 15, 2017 2:24 am
Forum: General Chit Chat
Topic: Know your English
Replies: 279
Views: 31457

Re: Know your English

How many of you know that the word "felicitate" is used only by Indians? I mean, the word is unknown to Americans and the British, it appears. I came to know of it only today, as I used the word in a faculty meeting in connection with celebrating 50 years of teaching by a colleague of mine. Blank st...